Now What? (G.A.D.)

Maybe he’ll have to call Bruce Blend, the expensive mindfulness provider uptown. Blend helped with the environmental stuff two years ago. Now if the neighbors are loud McCormick doesn’t fear home invasion. If the heater goes out he knows Julie and June can snuggle under a blanket. No one’s freezing to death on his watch, but other perils have risen.


Will Bruce know their chances of having to flee an inbound missile? Will he downplay the harm of a race-baiting president? Does he know if there will be fish in June’s ocean? Guns in her streets? If she will hope?

Let the Milk Bubble: Surrender Series (1)

June is impatient to add the oats. Keeps lifting her cup to the hot pan.


No. Let the milk bubble.

Ok, now.

Then she wants to stir, moves her stool too close. McCormick endures the risk.

When the goop is in the bowl she arranges apple slices just like the picture on the box, but adds a few raspberries. Then declines sugar or honey.

Doing it herself is sweet enough.

At school he unsticks a zipper, puts wet boots away. She doesn’t turn her head or say a word. Just a backwards wave.

Always, there will be these leavings.







The Eve of June


In bed that night, McCormick, nerves blazing, objects to tomorrow’s plans.

“The ferry to Jersey City? Why do you need your files? Then the subway uptown and back? You can’t put color in your hair anyway. And dinner with Alison? Julie, Jesus! After what we just went through?”

She uses the patient-but-not-really voice that will not be retired just because she’s so wrong this time.

“It was Braxton Hicks, Michael. Spotting is normal. They have chemical-free dye. This isn’t a health crisis. Women have babies every day.”

“Well, you might have one tomorrow. On a boat in the Hudson River.”

When Will It Be Over?

Barbara is a faithful reader, but the Winter series tests her limits.

“It’s too real. I just keep screaming, let it go!” She texts him one day.

And the next: “Please bring back Julie and June.”

He still hasn’t written about closing night, though. When he sneaks backstage and watches Winter and The King. Ted Jackson’s oily pecs have made McCormick a madman for six nights running. They hold hands and lock eyes as the final ovation rains down.

He stops typing. His wife and daughter have little colds. He hears them sniffling in their beds. Ok, maybe that’s enough.


Winter Speaks

(Defending herself against the charge that she’s heartless…)

I don’t care that he’s a tenor. This isn’t about his singing voice. It’s all his other voices. They never stop. When the phone rings I cringe. But my mother always lets him talk and his pauses and sighs suck the air out of the whole house.

Then before first period its McCormick and Snow with the morning announcements. Hah Hah! Making fun of Students for Peace with a bogus meeting of Students for War. And his weekly column. “Live Mike.” So clever.

Don’t forget the pitiful notes in my locker. How much of him do I have to take?


Reasons for Winter

Winter drove a Ford Falcon. Her forearms bowed with tension on the turns. It was a muscle car.

Her father kept it tuned at his shop but refused to purchase a power steering kit, explaining to McCormick “a beauty like that should be kept original.” Whether the NRA sticker on the bumper had been applied by Winter, Mr. Matheson, or a previous owner was a mystery.


The Falcon took them on their best date, up Middle Cottonwood. In the canyon Winter eased, spread the blanket she’d brought, opened her arms, laughed her alto laugh. The sun was hot all day.

Nothing You Can’t Do

June hears them first and pulls us into the square.

“Welcome to New York, Welcome to New York!” Two dozen big gay voices.

This is exactly why I moved to the Castro at twenty, and bought in the West Village at fifty. Freedom, like singing, comes from the drawing of breath.

Michael arrives for Empire State of Mind. We played it at our wedding.

He whoops for the top-knotted soloist, but I catch him eyeballing a hard-looking white-boy taking pictures outside the fence. He’s worried about an alt-right assault, I know it.

Dance with your daughter, McCormick. Fill your lungs.